Humanitarian Crises, Intervention and Security: A Framework for Evidence-Based Programming by Liesbet Heyse, Andrej Zwitter, Rafael Wittek, and Joost Herman (eds). London and New York: Routledge Studies in Intervention and Statebuilding, 2015.

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David Ritter explores the persistence of threats to the Great Barrier Reef.

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Once the 19th Congress of the Communist Party of China is behind us next month, Xi Jinping may be willing and able to strike a deal with Donald Trump under the terms of which China would completely halt oil exports to North Korea. However, Washington’s apparent belief that this would cause Kim Jong-un to abandon his nuclear aspirations may well prove to be ill-founded.

 

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A performance featured during the summer at the Manchester International Festival attempted to tackle the following timeless question: if women ruled the world, would they confront pressing social and political issues – such as climate change, military escalation and mass migration – in qualitatively different ways?

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This people-focused contribution questions fundamental assumptions about the persistence of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and discusses prerequisites for alternative strategies. It argues that without addressing people’s perceptions and beliefs, peace will remain elusive. It also argues that moving beyond the cycles of failure and impasses requires serious engagement in a process of decolonization of Palestine, new framings and new assumptions to understand why this conflict persists.

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The science of predicting hurricanes is crucial for disaster management and insurance, but also raises difficult methodological and philosophical questions. In this post, Joe Roussos asks whether hurricane modellers should average the results from different models of hurricane frequency.

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Patricia J. Sohn offers an alternative perspective on Trump's international engagements. 

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Gary Fooks and Tom Mills explore on of the main justifications given for Brexit.

Government estimates suggest that around half of all UK legislation with an impact on business, charities, and the voluntary sector originates from the EU. This is often used as an argument in favour of Brexit. But the overall costs and benefits of EU regulation are rarely scrutinised in depth.

The recent pace of international agreement aimed to reduce tax evasion and avoidance was completely unpredicted prior to the financial crisis. The two targets are often considered to be merely different dimensions of the same problem. This paper argues that the two problems actually involve very different logics, and this holds the key to the prospects for success. The assault on tax evasion confronts a problem that is commonly recognized and admits to amelioration through the increased information sharing that is rapidly, although unevenly, advancing.

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Young people feel that they’re not being listened to by global decision makers. But with over half of the world’s population under the age of 30, it won’t be long before they will be making their voices heard.