Paul Collier

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Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies, Oxford University.  He took a five year Public Service leave, 1998-2003, during which he was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank.   He is also a Professeur invitéat CERDI, Université d’Auverge, and at Paris 1. In 2008 Paul was awarded a CBE ‘for services to scholarship and development’.  He is the author of The Bottom Billion, which in 2008 won the Lionel Gelber, Arthur Ross and Corine prizes and in May 2009 was the joint winner of the Estoril Global Issues Distinguished Book Prize.  His latest book, Wars, Guns and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places was published in March 2009.  Paul is currently Advisor to the Strategy and Policy Department of the IMF, advisor to the Africa Region of the World Bank; and he has advised the British Government on its recent White Paper on economic development policy.  He has been writing a monthly column for the Guardian, and also writes for the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.  His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resources rich societies.

Paul Collier is a member of the Advisory Board of Global Policy.

Post Archive

22 April 2016
Paul Collier on the blance between morality and policy needed to address Europe's refugee crisis. Part of the world is still awash with conflict and poverty. Europe is a haven…
11 June 2014
Paul Collier argues Scotland’s oil policy could set a dangerous precedent for other EU countries. In September the Scots will vote on secession. For decades, the key slogan…
25 April 2014
Paul Collier argues that the project of building a United States of Europe sometimes leads to policies which undermine cooperation and convergence. At its foundation the European…
23 January 2014
Paul Collier explores the potential of private finance to support African development. Africa needs more infrastructure than its governments or donors can afford. However, while…
13 January 2014
Paul Collier argues for international policy cooperation to curb coal production. Germany is now producing more coal than for twenty years. This has occurred in a society that…
04 October 2013
Paul Collier calls for a serious conversation about the advantages and disadvantages of immigration. All high-income countries are facing accelerating migration from poor…
17 July 2013
Paul Collier argues that the tragedy of Egypt is to have held a premature election: its people have just been promised another one. Superficially, Egypt is back where it started…
29 May 2013
Paul Collier situates the G8 within the context of fiscal austerity and the persistent need for transparent government. At its best, the G8 can provide the coordinated action that…
10 May 2013
Paul Collier argues that analysts should disaggregate the label ‘developed country’ to acknowledge the inability of some European countries to compete in the global…
24 February 2013
Once again an African government is unable to secure its territory. Once again the only country willing to come to its timely rescue is the former colonial power: as Britain in…
19 November 2012
Forty years ago a British Conservative Prime Minister coined the phrase ‘the unacceptable face of capitalism’ to describe the practices of some companies. This month…
27 September 2012
The ECB has now committed to purchasing unlimited amounts of sovereign debt from Southern Europe. The structure of conditionality proposed by the ECB in return for this new…
16 August 2012
During my lifetime two class wars have been fought to resolution across Europe: one economic the other cultural. The outcomes of the economic class wars are uncontroversial. In…
23 July 2012
The Euro is a noble political project that was mis-designed. If it falls apart it will inflict massive economic dislocation and destroy the political vision of five decades. It…
03 July 2012
Social progress is, fundamentally, about policies that promote convergence towards the top: ‘convergence’, because otherwise it isn’t social; ‘towards the…