Emerging Global Governance

The Emerging Global Governance (EGG) Project is an initiative of the Foreign Policy Institute of the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in collaboration with Global Policy.

 

The Project brings together leading scholars to profile new research on global policy, global governance, global public goods provision, and global risk management across the range of relevant sectors and issue-areas, including global economy and development, the biosphere, global security, global health, migration. The EGG Project highlights innovative global policy ideas and international governance solutions arising from the emerging world, and at the interface between emerging powers and non-state actors, and the established actors in the system.

 

The EGG project profiles new evidence-based research and analysis of distinguished thinkers. Their work is presented in a range of project outputs, including

  • the EGG Commentary Series covering “core issues”, “new trends and patterns”, and “emerging hot issues” in shorter essay pieces (or briefing memo length pieces for decision-makers);
  • journal article length pieces and journal special featured sections in Global Policy; and
  • book manuscripts

 

The goal is to bridge the ongoing gap in knowledge-sharing between the scholarly and policy communities. The project's outputs will be listed below.

 

Project Co-Directors: Gregory T. Chin and Carla P. Freeman
Coordinating Editor: Carlos Salazar

 

 

 

Essays

 

What is Next? …for World Order and Global Governance

In the scholarly world, the most influential scholarship in International Relations, International Organization and International Political Economy has largely reflected the proposition that “exogenous conditions” can be assumed to be stable and largely unchanging, and the chief intellectual goal has been mapping how the actors in the system would adapt to, and internalize, the established norms and rules. There was really no need to debate fundamentals or first principles. Or so it was thought. But as the world has entered a period of dynamic change, it is increasingly apparent that another perspective is required – one that can grapple seriously with both change and continuity.

 

 

Commentaries

 

Core Issues

 

Can China and India Collaborate in Global Governance?

Kishore Mahbubani explores the prospects of a joint Chinese-Indian defence of globalisation

Emerging Global Governance (EGG): An Economist’s Perspective

Justin Lin and Wang Yan are the authors of the first commentary in the Emerging Global Governance (EGG) series. Their piece details the key shifts in the global economic landscape and comments on how the emergence of new institutions reflects the changing global economic reality.

The New Global Energy Governance

Ann Florini argues that agreements on climate and energy in 2015, and rapidly developing technologies, are creating opportunities that policymakers should seize.

Can Africa Truly Benefit from Global Economic Governance?

Garth le Pere explores Africa’s ongoing climb out of a peripheral global position and how the international community can work with it.

 

New Trends & Patterns

 

Hong Kong, the AIIB, and the Evolving Geography of Finance: A World Financial Center in the Making?

Gregory T. Chin explores Hong Kong’s lobbying for a special role in the AIIB and in the Belt & Road strategy, the number of visits by Asian state leaders, and corporate realignments across Asia.

Global Climate Action Amid Trump: Challenges…But Also Measured Optimism

Despite the worries, Kathryn Hochstetler finds room for transformative climate change action under newly elected President Trump.

Chinese Development Finance: A Convergence of Passions and Interests

Kevin P. Gallagher explores China's growing passion for green finance, south-south development cooperation, and global leadership.

Reshaping World Trade: The Export Finance of the Emerging Economies

Kristen Hopewell argues that export credit is proving to be a useful lens on both the challenges of multilateral cooperation amid contemporary power shifts, as well as the diminishing capacity of the US.

 

Emerging Hot Issues

 

Foundations 20 (F20): Non-Governmental Actors in Global Governance

Keith Porter explores the emergence of new groupings of international multi-stakeholder that are forcing the powers-that-be to acknowledge and act upon the wishes of real people.

The Maritime Silk Road Initiative (MSRI): Why India is Worried, What China Can Do

Amitendu Palit argues that the China-led Maritime Silk Road Initiative is causing ripples among Indian policymakers.