Brian Stoddart

Brian Stoddart

Brian Stoddart is Emeritus Professor at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia where he served as Vice-Chancellor, a higher education consultant internationally, a regular commentator on global issues, cruise ship lecturer, and a crime fiction writer.

He took his first two degrees in History from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, then a PhD from the University of Western Australia. His doctoral work was on nationalist politics in south India, beginning a long interest in the sub-continent. He then became a pioneer in the study of sports culture and his 1986 book, Saturday Afternoon Fever: Sport in the Australian Culture is still regarded as a definitive work. He went on to write numerous books and articles on aspects of sport in politics, international relations, business and the media as well as sports history. He is an authority on Caribbean cricket and culture, sport and international politics, and sports media. Brian Stoddart established one of the world’s first sports journalism degree programs at the University of Canberra in association with the Australian Institute of Sport.

He has maintained a strong interest in India, and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Australia-India Institute at the University of Melbourne. His recent books include A People’s Collector in the British Raj: Arthur Galletti (Delhi, 2011); Land, Water, Language and Politics in Andhra: Regional Evolution in India Since 1850 (Delhi, 2011); and (with Auriol Weigold (eds), India & Australia: Bridging Different Worlds (Delhi, 2011).

Brian Stoddart is well known as a columnist and commentator, and works now with social media (@BrianStoddart, and www.brianstoddartwriter.com).

In his most recent work as a consultant, he has lived extensively and worked in Lao PDR, Jordan, Syria and Cambodia. His memoir, A House in Damascus: Before the Fall, recounting his Old City immediately before the current problems, was an Amazon No.1 for Middle East Travel.

A Straits Settlement, the third of his Superintendent Le Fanu novels set in 1920s British India, was long listed in the 2017 Ngaio Marsh Award for best New Zealand crime novel.
 

Post Archive

22 September 2020
Many of GP’s contributors have been writing about the pandemic as part of their scholarly work. We were also curious about their personal experiences and thoughts amidst these…
27 August 2020
Brian Stoddart explores why Australia is eroding 50 years of relationship building with China. Amidst the COVID-19 crisis that has gripped Australia along with the rest…
07 July 2020
Brian Stoddart remembers Sir Everton Weekes as a major figure in the struggle for racial equality in sport, as well as one of the great cricketers. With the passing of Sir Everton…
06 May 2020
Brian Stoddart explores Australia's pantomime politics and its actors' performances in response to China's increasing regional power. Reading ex-Australian Prime Minister…
05 June 2019
Brian Stoddart argues that choosing the lesser of two political evils is the new global normal. It is now a truism to note that politics in the West are either in transition, “…
02 January 2018
It might seem odd to have viewed Darkest Hour and Padmaavat on the same day, and even more odd to then reflect on regional and global politics and international differences. But…
23 October 2017
Brian Stoddart explores New Zealand's recent elections. A tiny outpost slightly north of Antarctica, New Zealand is long renowned as a social laboratory. In 1893 it became the…
02 May 2017
Every few years the Writers Guild of America goes on strike and script creators for film, television and late night shows across the USA down tools. Brian Stoddart explores why…
14 July 2016
Brian Stoddart comments on a growing global ennui with a professional political class seen to be self-serving and aloof. As we contemplate the mounting wreckage of the United…
15 March 2016
Brian Stoddart explores Narendra Modi’s background and recent developments in India to argue that the Prime Minister may soon have to answer searching questions from…
01 July 2014
Brian Stoddart suggests that India’s interest in the South China Sea holds greater lessons for how Asian powers may engage each other in years to come. As dispute temperatures…
09 April 2014
Brian Stoddart argues that as India increasingly moves into the global mainstream its fast approaching elections matter inside and out (this post first appeared in April 2013).…
12 August 2013
Brian Stoddart examines the possible directions of the emerging economic powerhouse and what they may mean for onlookers. Now that Manmohan Singh’s Congress-led United Progressive…
14 January 2013
In the current round of the never-ending grind that is now international cricket, there are strong reminders that the game, like sport generally, carries strong social and…
03 December 2012
Two current sports stories constitute something of an allegory about why India continues to present a policy and strategy challenge for those countries which in recent years have…